Interior Wood Finishes
PAINT AND DECOR SHOPPING ADVICE
When shopping for paint, remember to bring your cushions, fabric, wall or floor covering samples with you. While you're in the store, use the take home chips in the color display to locate your accessory colors as well. Assemble a collection of paint chips that best represents the colors found in your decor. Create your own mini-fandeck comprised of your personal color pallette and take it with you every time you shop for your home decorating needs.
COLOR TERMINOLOGY

MONOCROMATIC schemes utilize color from the same family on the wheel. This will include all the light tints, dark shades as well as the clean and muted versions of that color family.

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COMPLEMENTARY color schemes use colors opposite each other on the color wheel. Used together, this combination of warm and cool colors creates excitement and energizes any decor. Opposite colors are perfect as accent colors in a neutral decor.

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TRIADIC schemes use three colors that are equally spaced from each other on the color wheel. Similar color values can be used, such as primary colors for children's rooms. Colors can also be arranged in varying degrees with one color dominant, another color as secondary and the third color as an accent.

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ANALOGOUS schemes use colors of the same temperature near each other on the wheel. These schemes evoke a specific mood, such as calm and tranquil or warm and inviting.

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SPLIT COMPLEMENTARY color schemes combine the two colors on either side of a color's complement. This combination of colors adds variety to a room in a pleasant but active way.

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DOUBLE COMPLEMENTARY color schemes are created by using colors that are next to each other and then finding their opposites on the color wheel.

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WARM AND COOL PALETTES

The color wheel can be divided into half, with warm colors on one side and cool colors on the other. Warm colors like red, yellow and orange tend to heat up a room. These colors are considered energetic and stimulate activity. These colors are a good choice for kitchens, dinning rooms, living rooms and play rooms. Warm colors tend to advance and therefore close in a room. Use warm colors to cozy up a large room.

SAME ROOM - TWO LOOKS
Warm colors advance and cool colors recede. These photos showing the same room taken at the same angle demonstrate that perfectly. The photo featuring the warm colors appears much closer to you while the photo with the green hues looks like it was taken from a distance
Cool colors like blue, green and violet are quiet and tranquil colors. They are best used in rooms that call for relaxation and calm. Use cool colors in bedrooms, bathrooms, dens and nurseries. Use cool colors in sunny rooms where they act as a counter balance to direct sunlight. Cool colors are recessive; they give the illusion of pushing back walls thereby making a small room look larger.
DECORATING MADE SIMPLE

Confused about color? Check out Van Sickle's Decorating Made Simple Booklet. Decorating Made Simple combines basic color theory with classic color stories in an easy to understand format that is immediately applicable to your own decorating projects.

To obtain a copy of Decorating Made Simple please send us an email inquiry from our Contact Us page or call (800) 677-2468.